// NOTES WAR AND PEACE (BOOK I - CHAPTER 12-25)//

The book is getting more and more interesting. I suppose this is because I have accustomed to the characters and the world they live in, the mundane life and the latent dread as well as enthusiasm of the war abroad.

The parts from chapter 12 through 25 tells the preparation for the war of the Drubetskoys and the Bolkonskys.

In brief, the setting moved from Petersburg to Moscova. Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskaya after getting Vasily Kuragin to bring her son — Boris Drubetskoy — out into the adjacent guard, came to Count Kiril Vladimirovich Bezukhov … to be blunt, to get money (or for her: to do justice to Pierre). Prince Vasily and the Bezukhov Princess (mostly Katish — the eldest, who blindly believe devoted herself to the Count for the hope that she would automatically get something in return — inheriting the Count’s fortune) tried to destroy the Count’s will that leaves everything to Pierre - the illegitimate son.

- Princess Katish: she is funny, but at the same time has despicable character. Understanding how the situation (the Count’s heir is not her and her sisters) is becoming truer, she acted as if she had lost hope in humanity and throw a tantrum  by saying that she doesn’t need anything and she would just devote herself without asking anything in return, although she would be left without a penny and a hard life after the Count’s death. Amazingly, she reminds me of myself. I don’t want to be blind like that. Luckily she got Prince Vasily to be conscious and try to get her on the reasonable path. In the end, she still lost everything. —— Poor her! — And thinking about father’s fortune while he’s dying is terrible of a person — The lesson is to handle the mundane monetary matter.

- Anna Mikhailovna: a scary woman. I don’t know if she is shameless or just audacious and motherly sacrificial. But after begging Prince Vasily to help her son, she proceeded to take away the Count fortune, implying that it was only for justice. I also don’t understand how relationship works in Russian in the 1800s, but she seemed only to be an acquaintance of Count - yet claiming to have the responsibility to act like a real relative. She appears to be very fake. — The lesson is to look, distinct, and beware of between those who come to you for benefits or truly from their kind and concerning heart only.

- Prince Andrei Bolkonskys: more and more appear as a man who follows his ideal. To do things greater than the mundane gossips that “belongs to women”. —— Admirable man but will be a pain to leave with (poor Lisa).

- Princess Lisa Bolkonskys: probably the happiest yet most miserable woman ever, having Prince Andrei as her husband. She was left at the Bolkonskys estates in the country. A society woman as herself, devoid of her company, as well as in her beautiful age, would be as lamentable as a withered flower.

- Princess Mary Bilkonskys: pious Christian is scary.

- Prince Nikolai Bolkonskys: again another admirable man, and a pain to live with. Time and schedule is important to him — I agree.

- Pierre/Count Bezukhov (after Kiril Bezukhov’s death): his personality started to diverge from my Matryoska, but still, maybe I haven’t known him well enough. I can see him being as lost at surrounding meanings as Pierre during the mass for Count Kiril’s death, yet still follow his instructor (in this case Princess Mikhailovna) as if it was right to be. Part one close with him inheriting the Bezukhov’s fortune. He is to be really interesting (I hope to mature/bloom into something beautiful) later.

lip-lock:

City Map Illustrations | by Anna Bond of Rifle Paper Co.

Check out these delightful prints of city map illustrations by Anna Bond, co-founder of Rifle Paper Co. I’m a big fan of her work, and I’d gladly add everything on Rifle Paper Co.’s website to my wishlist! Purchase these prints here

(via vincecarters)

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India
In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.
The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.
Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.
“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India

In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.

The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.

Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.

“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

(via di-glossia)

// 1 Litre no Namida (One liter of tears) - by Aya Kito//

"One liter of tears" is the most well-celebrated yet artistically - terrible book I have ever read. Its content is broken and disconnected, just as its author. But "One liter of tears" is celebrated not for its artistic language or its strenuous story. It is celebrated for the author effort and hopes. With enough life experience as to understand what kind of hardship Aya is facing while writing her thoughts into her diary, readers just have to admire her fortitude. Her book, published shortly before her death, told her life story from how she lost and gain hope and happiness in life. Getting spinocerebellar degeneration, a disease that cause her to lost control over her body, at 15 — the age where people start to want to explore the world filled with hope and expectation for the future — she came to a realization that her sickness was only going to get worse and she’ll eventually die without leaving any mark on the world. At first, she resent herself and life for making her suffer, but later she came to accept her fate and try to live meaningful and leave a mark on the world by writing diary, proving that she is not all useless.

Her strength inspires people in imperilment to not give up on life.

// Notes War and Peace (Book I - Chapter 1-11)//

So far the book have introduced me to some characters and bits of what’s going on for some people.

The elite in Russia in particular and Europe in general seems to fancy French as a high class language. (Needs to confirm?) But French is integrate in almost every conversations in the book so far.

- Anna Pavlovna: the first character introduced. She is a lady of high account in her mid-40s. She has a wide relation-network and knows how to manner in society. She seems to be a good hottest, knowing when and where to organize her party. Not only is alike the average women who engage in small talk and gossip, she also knows how to arrange bigger things (such as arranging marriage between Anatole and Bolkonsky’s cousin) and interests in politics. —— Very pro-Russian.

- Prince Vasily: seems to have power and a good family, but doesn’t trust his own devices. —— Not very interested character/weak personality.

- Pierre (Bezukhov): Eager for knowledge and a good intellectual development, as observed through his enthusiasm to enter interesting conversation and input his thoughts and neglect to boring small talk at his first social present at Anna Pavlovna’s gathering. His studying abroad is blamed for his presumptuousness, bad manners, and social awkwardness. But he is a pretty socially thoughtless person. He reminds me of my Matryoshka from “Disillusion from far away”. And his physique was also similar, tall and long strike and awkward hand positions. But anyway, Pierre has a weak (but interesting) inner character. He was tempted to the (bad kind of) fun at Kuragin sons. But I believe he himself is not bad. He just needs to be in better companies. (This again reminds me of when Matryoshka fenced in public places and got in trouble.) Pierre is unsure of what he wants to do. (And this reminds me of how Matryoshka didn’t declare major in his freshman year at college) —— Really interesting person/character. — Underdog in the spot light!

- Prince Andrey: seems to be of admirable characteristic. Seems complacent but at the same time his serene silence indicates that a hurricane in swirling inside him. (especially the part when he said marriage was a mistake for him, a weight that holds him down - and this was pretty asshole of him) —— Looking forwards to see deeper character development in him.

- Natasha Rostova: seems to be a bad/naive girl when she kiss Borish. —— underlying a more important character throughout the book.

The average women (such as Lisa Bolkonsky — Prince Andrey’s wife) seems to depends too much on man/husband.

I need to get this off my chest.

I’ve never been in a relationship before and the guy I have fancied 10 months now told me he already had a girlfriend in his hometown.

Anyway, I have tried to convince myself not to fancy about him anymore, and I can’t really help it.

But yesterday, I dreamt that I was in a relationship with him. (And for some reason I remembered that he looked like Owen Wilson.)

Anyway, it was terrifying. I woke up in the middle of the night. 

How does it feel like being in a relationship? Is it scary? Is it depressing? I tend to romanticize life as in a shoujo manga, but last night dream, of my crush, was uncomfortable, and … soul-crushing!!

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:
Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
Dramatic use of color.
Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.
In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.
One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

(via adalaidee)

Anonymous said: But would someone actually start a war because they felt insulted because they didn't get a wedding invite? Really?

dyannehs:

Anon, lemme introduce you to my home girl Matilda.

image

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// The Disappearing Spoon - by Sam Kean//

Started around late March or April, finally, today, August 12th, 2014, I have finished the book. It was a long time of delay due to school, finals, and moving, and vacation, and research. But I was determined to stick to finishing the book, because it’s worth it. The book is truly a great book for anyone who wants to learn more about what happens behind the flashy science.

For chemistry lovers and non-lovers alike, the book can interest a broad range of readers. The book contain from comedies to hard-core science.

The name of the book — “The Disappearing Spoon” — is intriguing. It evokes a sense that the book might be fictional or that it is very general to the point that it would lost the quirky science. I have to tell you first and foremost that the book adheres to what truly happened in history. The meaning of the name can come from one story in the book (chapter 3), relating to the discovery of Gallium (Ga, 31). A popular trick with Gallium, which looks like aluminium, is to make it into a spoon, serve your guess with tea, and watch them ‘recoil when their Earl Grey “eats” their utensils.’ This a quite a stupid joke as Gallium can be fairly toxic to human (considering any chunk of metal is harmful to human when eaten directly.) Not much study has been done on the effect of gallium to health, since its pure form is (1) unstable and its ions tend to form compound with other elements, and (2) gallium is valuable in electrical engineering — which is quite irony when people use it a lot but do not fully understand its effect on human health. Back to the name of the book, it might describe the elusiveness of elements on the periodic table. Atoms — small elements that make up the world — was being predicted and philosophized 400 BC, during the time of Socrates and Plato. They were on their way to find out what makes up the world. They were on their way to propose a periodic table that would create a meaningful system to categorize existing elements and a powerful tool to discover more elements. Dmitri V. Mendeleev and his proposal (which is the initial model for the current popular castle-like rectangular table) were introduced in chapter 3. The initial table has many holes in them, where Mendeleev would predict the existence of yet-to-discover elements. A huge part of the book dedicates to describe the race to hunt down these holes. Like the spoon that we use in everyday life, many elements exist around us, we were just yet to identify them. The later part of the book touches more on radioactive elements which is more elusive. History is filled with people trying to discover new things and many times they are fooled by something already discovered. The making of the periodic table is the same. Especially during the world war, when the understand of atomic structure and quantum physics provide effective tools to probe into elements’ identifications, throughout the world, scientists race to identify and synthesize new elements to earn the right to name the elements, honored after whatever they chose to. The book tells many story of almost-there attempts to claim discoveries. Elements can also be deceptive. They can fool man’s sense, as told in details in chapter 11 — “How elements deceive”. Character of long-known elements like copper is visited again in chapter 10 — “Take two elements, call me in the morning” — with Legionnaires’s disease in 1976 Philadelphia. Chapter 10 tells stories of amazing characters of ordinary elements like copper and not-so-ordinary elements like silver. Again, the name of the book is meaningful, after you have read the book itself. We all know the elements now, as widely as we know the spoon, but not all of use know of the “disappearing” story behind each elements.

The book is divided into five parts, each part contains of three to four chapter, all bring fourth the same sense of the part. Starting out from Ancient time of Greek philosophy and ending with today and beyond possibility of how much we can still discover of our elements, the book presents a series of back stories involving the periodic table.

I read the 2010 edition of the book. The name of the first edition, though long, elaborate more on exactly what the book is telling its readers. I usually shortly summarize the book as “the history of the periodic table”, but that is not exactly true. The book tells you more about the history, the drama of the world, through the relation with the elements that are tied together in the periodic table. In brief, and in the exact original name by the author Sam Kean, “The disappearing spoon” comes along with “other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements.”