isometries:

engrprof:

mathmajik:

MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)
1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN. Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”
2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.  Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.
3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.  Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.
4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER. Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.
5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.  A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.
6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT. The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.
7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS. There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.
8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS. Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.
9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY. Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.
10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.
11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T. Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.
12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.  There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.
 Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.
Revised: Summer 1999  Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC) Southwest Texas State University
Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

Another myth:  Arithmetic is math.  It’s one little bit and lots of mathematicians hate arithmetic.

everything here is good except #4. there is certainly a need to know how you got your answer, or what your answer means, or else what you’re doing isn’t actually math. granted, it can sometimes be easier to get an answer than to explain an answer, but the explanation is always more important than the answer itself (this is true in mathematics, at least. in other disciplines, take your answer and run)

isometries:

engrprof:

mathmajik:

MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)

1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN.
Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”

2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.
Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.

3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.
Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.

4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER.
Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.

5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.
A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.

6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT.
The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.

7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS.
There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.

8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS.
Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.

9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY.
Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.

10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.

11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T.
Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.

12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.
There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.


Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.

Revised: Summer 1999 
Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC)
Southwest Texas State University

Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

Another myth:  Arithmetic is math.  It’s one little bit and lots of mathematicians hate arithmetic.

everything here is good except #4. there is certainly a need to know how you got your answer, or what your answer means, or else what you’re doing isn’t actually math. granted, it can sometimes be easier to get an answer than to explain an answer, but the explanation is always more important than the answer itself (this is true in mathematics, at least. in other disciplines, take your answer and run)

(via mathematica)

Constant success is a scary thing. It makes you forget failure. It makes you scare of failing and avoid taking risk. The worst thing is, it makes you forget how to accept failure.
The recent rejection from the continuing student scholarship knock me out of my delusion that I can achieve anything, pull me out of my comfort zone. I almost fall into a trap of “ivy delusion”, and forget that above me is still a tall mountain and I am far from the reaching the apex.

sixpenceee:

thebartolonomicron:

sixpenceee:

EVERYDAY THE SAME DREAM is an art game about alienation and refusal of labour. You are a faceless, unnamed man going about his business. The game has alternatives endings. Will you end up going to work and working in a little cubicle like every day, or will you take another route and do something different for once? 

PLAY IT HERE

You may also like: ENTITY

OK LEMME TALK ABOUT EVERY DAY THE SAME DREAM.

My history of game design teacher had us play through this game for ten minutes one class, and then played it on the projector.

At first no one seemed to really get it, it just seemed like a daily life simulator with catchy music (the music carries the game beautifully, don’t play it on mute if you can help it).

Then some of the other students began murmuring and questioning the point of the game after a few play throughs.

Yes, there are different ways to end the day, but the game has only one true ending, which is reached after ending the day every way possible.

Don’t judge the game by the minimalist graphics and simple gameplay mechanics. Every Day the Same Dream is a brilliantly crafted and for some a highly therapeutic experience.

Things you do one day can and often will affect the following days, (your wife leaves you, the homeless man vanishes, you lose your job, etc.) Until you’re left with only one final option, which I won’t spoil.

To paraphrase my professor, this game makes you look for a deeper meaning, not just in the game but also in yourself. It takes you to a place within yourself you need to be to understand yourself and how you interact with the real world.
Play it all the way through and see for yourself.

I think everyone needs to hear this

(via ashestoashesjc)

If your ship doesn’t come in, swim out to it. - Jonathan Winters
If your ship doesn’t come in, swim out to it. - Jonathan Winters

professorfonz:

professorfonz:

Did you miss me? After a long hiatus (full-time work has its downsides, it appears), I am back with a new knitlock giveaway. 

Recently I noticed that I seem to have developed a bit of a knitlock problem, having designed and knitted no less than 5 jumpers (and a cardi) in the last two years or so. Endless hiatus + profound fixation on the 221B wallpaper = knitlock madness. So I decided to give one away!

The winner of this giveaway will receive 221 B Skulls (click x), the jumper I designed and knitted in the first year of my knitlock addiction. Hand-knitted in luxurious Merino/Silk mix. Size Women’s M (around UK 12) - check my ravelry page for more detailed description (click x)

The second winner will receive Deduction Game Chullo ( click x) - based on the unforgettable specimen from The Empty Hearse. Hand-knitted in 100% NZ wool.

You don’t have to be following me to enter. But it would be nice if you did. In fact, let me give you an extra incentive. If you follow me and win, I’ll throw in a Sherlockian Phone Cosy (click x) to complete your prize.

GIVEAWAY RULES:

  • likes and reblogs both count 
  • reblog as many times as you want, just no spamming please!
  • I will ship anywhere in the world
  • no giveaway blogs please! (I will check)
  • ask boxes must be open so I can contact you
  • you must be comfortable with giving me your address
  • I will pick the winners via a random number generator
  • I will message the winners - if I don’t get a reply within 3 days, I’ll choose another winner

You have up until midnight (GMT) 19 July,  to enter. 

The game is… something.

image

I just realised that I accidentally set the end date of this giveaway to coincide with Benedict’s birthday! 

(via thecircusofme)

hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.

(Source: cheekygeekymonkey, via dumb-science-jokes)

shingekinokyojinheaven:

"Video Games are only for kids-

image

"Video Games have no educational value-

image

"Video Games are a waste of time and players have no life-

image

(via ashestoashesjc)